Posts — indian art

LET'S START ART: APRIL 2019

Let's Start Art: April
"Did you notice, I'm in class 3rd now, and that means I'll get to attend the art classes", said Golu from Government Primary School, Nagwa, when we started the art sessions.  The new academic session started with the first week of April, so did our art sessions. In the first set of workshops, we asked the students to draw what they know about their city- Varanasi.

Sohrai: The Traditional Harvest art of Jharkhand

Sohrai: the Harvest Art
The Sohrai art painted on the mud wall is a matriarchal tradition handed down from mother to daughter. Usually either monochromatic or colorful, these paintings are done totally by using natural pigments mixed in the mud. The people coat the wall with a layer of white mud, and while the white layer is still wet, they draw with their fingertips or with broken pieces of combs or with chewed saal wood tooth-sticks (datwan). The Sohrai art celebrates fertility in the harvest where the walls are painted with animal motifs.

Indian Art Series: The Great Goddess Battles the Demons

The story is told at great length in the Devi Mahatmya - literally, 'Glory of the Great Goddess', also referred as Durga Saptashati - a text embedded inside 'Markandeya Purana'. The folio of is from a dispersed manuscript of the Devi Mahatmya.


Indian Art Series: Meru- The Golden Mountain

The Purana describes that the Mount Meru is surrounded by four other mountains as it's supports- Suparshva, Kumud, Mandara, and Mermandara. On these four mountain ranges stand four great trees- the Mango, the Jambu, the Kadamb, and the Banyan. The manuscript of the Anandi Patan has an extraordinarily painted leaf with a picture of Mount Meru on it.


Madhubani Painting: The Art of Sublime Beauty

Mirroring the activities and elements of the human and animal world with colorful geometrical patterns, the cow dung coated mud walls of these houses reflect the ancient tradition of elaborate wall painting or Bhitti Chitra practiced in the Mithila region of Bihar and the adjoining parts of Tarai in Nepal.